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Just as it was hard to believe that Christmas was fast approaching, it is even more difficult to believe Christmas has passed and we are now standing at the threshold of the New Year 2019.

I am excited to see what the New Year holds for me in the way of the many opportunities God will afford me; but, before I plunge headlong into the New Year, it would serve me well to take an inventory of the past year, and possibly make some New Year’s Resolutions.

                When I was in high school, I worked for the local super market as a cashier. However, on the day before New Year, the store closed, and all employees had to participate in dreaded inventory. Every single item on the shelves (as well as the shelves themselves) was counted and tagged so that the company might know their net profit and loss. We need to do the same with our individual lives.

                We might ask such questions as: “What goals did I set for the past year, and did I attain them?” “Was I productive, or did I allow so much of my time to be wasted?” And, with the personal inventory of our life ended, we begin to make resolutions for the New Year. Among the many resolutions are the ones we make every year, such as: “I am going to lose weight.” “I am going to cease some of the vices I have.” “I am going to make better use of my time.” Usually, by the end of the first week, every one of the resolutions we make have been broken. Then, we excuse ourselves saying: “Oh well, the spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak.”

                Hmmm! Is it true that the flesh IS weak? Or, is it just true that we make casual resolutions without forethought or the determination to succeed? It has been said: “A failure to plan is a plan to fail.” There is no need for us to fail to keep the resolutions we make if we are serious.

                One resolution we often make (if we do not do so already), is to become more active in attending church on a weekly basis. Why? Because we know that fellowship with other believers is essential to our walk of faith. The writer of Hebrews tells us that “…we are not to forsake the assembling of ourselves together as the manner of some is, but so much the more as we see that day approaching” (Hebrews 10:25).

                Fellowship with other believers, and ‘follow-ship’ with the Lord, will help each of us to start the New Year off right, and to add meaning and purpose to enrich our life.

- Jerry L. Dunn, Oak Street Baptist Church        

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